Verbena – Digestive – Detoxifying | Monastic recipes

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Verbena is an exceptional herb and has a very characterizing aroma that reminds that of a lemon. It has many properties that are beneficial for the human body and especially for the good health of the digestive system.

 

Net Weight: 25 gr

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Description

Verbena for the good function of the digestive system

Verbena is a herb that is used for the good function of the digestive system and especially for colics, indigestion and gas. It is a well known plant especially in Greece and it is also used for sore throats and respiratory tract diseases such as asthma and whooping cough.

Verbena: Properties

Verbena is used for depression, hysteria, generalized seizure, arthritis, metabolic disorders, «iron-poor blood» (anemia), fever and recovery after fever. Other uses include treatment of pain, spasms, exhaustion, nervous conditions, digestive disorders, liver and gallbladder diseases, jaundice and kidney and lower urinary tract disorders. It is also suitable for periods of diet and detoxification and ideal for weight loss. It contributes to the detoxification of the body and the removal of excess fluid as well as to cellulite reduction.

Women use verbena for treating symptoms of menopause, irregular menstruation and increasing milk flow in cases of breast-feeding. Some people use verbena to treat poorly healing wounds, abscesses and burns, for arthritis, dislocations, bone bruises and itching. Verbena is also used as a gargle for cold symptoms and other conditions of the mouth and throat.

Preparation

Add a tablespoon of the herb in a pot and then put inside boiled water. Leave it for about five – ten minutes and then strain it. If you want to add a bit of sweetness to your tea, try adding a small spoonful of honey.

 

Net Weight: 25 gr

 

Additional information

Weight0.04 kg

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